Operator of Orange County malls Fashion Island – Irvine Spectrum – Tustin and Irvine Market Place says it shares license plate data with local police, but not ICE

A major Orange County land developer that owns three shopping centers equipped with cameras that read license plates said Wednesday it does not share information about vehicles captured in the recordings with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Irvine Co. said the data collected by a contractor are “only shared with local police departments as part of their efforts to keep the local community safe.”

Those shopping centers include Fashion Island in Newport Beach, the Irvine Spectrum Center in Irvine and the Market Place on the border of Tustin and Irvine.

Both the Irvine and Newport Beach police departments said Wednesday that their respective agencies don’t share that data with ICE. Tustin police did not immediately respond to a call for comment.

The statements came after a report published Tuesday by the Electronic Frontier Foundation raised privacy concerns about how the data are used.

According to Irvine Co., the readers record license plate numbers as well as the location, date and time the information is collected. Encrypted information is then sent to a searchable database operated by Vigilant Solutions, a Livermore, Calif., business that collects information from license plate readers for law enforcement and private entities.

In Irvine, the technology would notify police when there’s a hit on cars that have been reported stolen or are associated with a wanted suspect, Irvine police spokeswoman Kim Mohr said.

“It’s like having extra patrol officers, in a way, because it’s the eyes out there,” Mohr said, adding that police cars are also outfitted with the technology.

In Newport Beach, investigators can search the Irvine Co. database as part of active criminal investigations or patrol operations, but they haven’t actually ever used the tool in that way, Newport Beach police spokeswoman Jennifer Manzella said.

“It’s not a database that we can just peruse at will,” Manzella said. “We have to be able to document who is querying it and why it’s being queried.”

Though Irvine Co. says it does not sell its information or share it with ICE, immigration authorities do have access to data collected from license plate readers elsewhere by commercial third parties and sold to Vigilant Solutions, according to the Northern California firm. In some cases, Vigilant Solutions owns the cameras the third parties use.

Vigilant spokeswoman Mary Alice Johnson declined to identify those third parties but said some include repossession companies whose trucks are outfitted with license plate readers. None of the third parties are law enforcement agencies, she said.

ICE is among at least 1,000 law enforcement agencies across the country that pay for access to the database — and it’s up to those agencies to set policies on how to use the information, Johnson said.

In a statement, ICE said that it uses information as a tool in criminal and civil immigration enforcement investigations and must comply with its own privacy rules.

“ICE is not seeking to build a license plate reader database, and will not collect nor contribute any data to a national public or private database,” the agency said. Its rules, ICE said, “are the most stringent requirements known to have been applied for the use of this technology.”

The American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Northern California is suing for records about ICE’s use of the technology, including contracts with the private companies operating the databases, training material, privacy policies and other documents.

“Aggregation of this information into databases containing billions of license plate scans stretching back months and even years threatens core civil rights and liberties protected by the Constitution,” the ACLU of Northern California said on its website.

Times staff writer Cindy Carcamo contributed to this report.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-irvine-company-license-plates-20180711-story.html

Another One with the “Keys to the Candy Store” – Tustin Cheerleading booster club member suspected of inappropriate contact with underage girl

A 50-year-old member of the Tustin High School Cheer Booster Club was arrested Wednesday for allegedly engaging in inappropriate conversations with a female juvenile, authorities said.
Patrick Thomas, 50 of Tustin, was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of engaging in inappropriate conversations with a female juvenile, authorities said. Thomas is a member of the Tustin Hgih School Cheer Booster Club. (Courtesy of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department)
Mike Patrick Thomas, 50 of Tustin, was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of engaging in inappropriate conversations with a female juvenile, authorities said. Thomas is a member of the Tustin Hgih School Cheer Booster Club. (Courtesy of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department)

The suspect, Mike Patrick Thomas of Tustin, is suspected to have made inappropriate contact with an underage girl, including text messages and conversations, an Orange County Sheriff’s Department release said.

During its investigation, the Sheriff’s Department discovered Thomas had been accused of similar activity a few years ago, the release said. No arrest was made in that prior incident.

The department’s investigation is ongoing.

Given his connection to the cheerleading booster club, investigators believe there may be more victims and are seeking additional information. Anyone with information on possible victims can call investigators at 714-647-7064.

https://www.ocregister.com/2018/04/12/tustin-cheerleading-booster-club-member-suspected-of-inappropriate-contact-with-underage-girl/

That’s what happened at Fullerton Police Chief Danny Hughes’ grand farewell party on November 10th

Editorial –

Licking – Sucking and Masturbating Each Other – That’s what happened at Fullerton Chief Danny Hughes’ grand farewell party on November 10th –

Fullerton, California –

The Finest of Farewells
January 2, 2017

It is common for government to bury waste carefully, neatly hidden away from the citizens who pay for it. Other times, they shove it right in your face like an ether-soaked rag.

That’s what happened at Chief Danny Hughes’ grand farewell party on November 10th. Fortunately, one neighbor filed an hour-long interactive grievance and shared with us the highlights.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgDeUrtiPhI

Helicopter overhead, fire engines, barricades, officers, SWAT trucks, oh my!

The cast of characters does not disappoint. Look carefully for the appearance an oblivious “Patdown” Pat “I hired them all” McPension. Watch the FPOA thank Hughes for staying “on course” through “the lowest parts” of FPD history (when their constant misdeeds were finally exposed to the public). Listen to Jan Flory offer a cringe-worthy come-hither to her “Big Boy” Hughes, warn him of the “five-headed beast” that is the city council, and then trumpet her slavish dependence on city staff. Don’t forget to note Stan Berry, the OCDA investigator and FPD buddy boy who was first charged with looking into the Kelly Thomas murder. I’m glad he was able to maintain good relations.

If you were able to retain your lunch through all of that, congratulations. Now think about the hundreds of Fullerton commuters and residents who were caught in the traffic blockades on two major roads during rush hour. The police force parked their equipment and their posteriors in the middle of the roadway for this pointless pomp and circumstance, holding the public and its safety in complete disregard.

Of course the most comic part of this display of flags and armaments (think Soviet May Day parade) is the fact that just two days before, Mr. Integrity ordered his boyz to give City Manager, Joe Felz a free ride home with no Breathalyzer test after having careened though a sleepy Fullerton neighborhood after an evening of partying in the gin mills of downtown Fullerton.

http://www.fullertonsfuture.org/2017/the-finest-of-farewells/